BDA


Recent articles in BerNews, the Bermuda Sun and the Royal Gazette (and others)

International news is at the bottom of the page




Lindo’s Group of Companies announced that the 2017 Lindo’s to Lindo’s has raised $25,860 for the Bermuda Diabetes Association [BDA].
The 10K run and 4-mile walk, which saw contestants running and walking from the Lindo’s Family Foods in Warwick to Lindo’s Market in Devonshire, were organised in conjunction with the BDA and the Mid Atlantic Athletic Club [MAAC] and sanctioned by the Bermuda National Athletics Association.
Read the full story in Bernews.



After struggling with type 2 diabetes for more than a decade, Irene Mello finally feels like she has her life back.
The 62-year-old was one of the first Argus members to take part in the diabetes reversal programme offered by Premier Health and Wellness Centre and the Bermuda Diabetes Association.
Read the full story in the Royal Gazette.



Graham Redford of RUBiS presents Debbie Jones and Sara McKittrick with a cheque for $3532.30 raised by'Fueling 4 a Cause'
Story on Bernews.

Diabetes is not a death sentence

Type 2 diabetes is a challenge, not a death sentence, according to Annabel Fountain.
But Dr Fountain stressed that patients needed the right tools to succeed and education is key.
The island's only endocrinologist spoke with The Royal Gazette to shed light on the disease that is threatening to cripple the island's healthcare system

Read the full story in the Royal Gazette.

Final piece of type 1 diabetes puzzle solved

A complete picture of the areas that the immune system attacks to cause type 1 diabetes has finally been revealed by scientists.
The study, published in the journal Diabetes, discovered the fifth and final critical target at which the immune system errantly takes aim.

More from BBC News

Spare change could change a life
Got any spare cash? It just might change a life.
Three teenagers are asking residents to hand over any loose coins in their pockets, couches and laundry.
It’s part of a school project in aid of the Bermuda Diabetes Association. The money will be used to educate students so they don’t end up with the disease themselves.

Read the full story in the Royal Gazette.

The Bermuda Diabetes Association partnered with the Ministry of Health in celebrating World Health Day on April 7th as the theme for this year is diabetes. Many of you attended the event which was fun, entertaining and educational. We are grateful to our farmers, Bermyfresh and Mr. Organic who set up a mini market. La Trattoria provided platters of cooked vegetables, soup and coleslaw and their executive chef, Mike Hammond gave a demonstration of how to prepare these dishes. Marketplace provided raw vegetables and the Supermart, delicious hummus.

Other partners included TB Cancer and Health, Open airways and the Society for the Blind. In Motion dance studio choreographed a flash mob which was performed by some of their dancers and the audience to Shakira's Waca Waca. It was a fun day which was opened by the Rt Worshipful Mayor of Hamilton, Mr Charles Gosling. The Hon Minister of Health, Seniors and the Environment Ms. Jeanne Atherdon, gave an overview of diabetes in Bermuda, Debbie Jones Chair of the Bermuda Diabetes Association thanked everyone for attending, Sara McKittrick educator for the Bermuda Diabetes Association gave some practical tips for changing behavior and the Ministry of Health presented a Commit to Change pledge.


Bermuda's war against diabetes
The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Bermuda, at once one of the most common and preventable chronic health conditions in the world, has reached genuinely alarming levels.
By almost any measure, Bermuda is a world-beater when it comes to a disease that owes far more to lifestyle choices than genetic or environmental factors.

Read the full Opinion piece in the Royal Gazette.

Diabetes could ‘bankrupt’ health system
Bermudians need a “business plan” to combat diabetes, according to the chairman of the Bermuda Diabetes Association.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.



Some of the members of Team Diabetes from Canada who came to compete in the Bermuda Triangle Challenge in January

Tackling the global diabetes time bomb
Sir Michael Hirst, the president of the International Diabetes Federation, is on the Island speaking at the Bermuda Diabetes Association's Health Summit.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

Children with diabetes can learn from bear
A group of children living with Type 1 diabetes were this weekend introduced to a new friend designed to help them manage their condition — Jerry the Bear.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

Call for swift action to tackle diabetes
The Island’s diabetes epidemic demands swift preventive action, according to Debbie Jones, director of the Bermuda Diabetic Association, who commended St George’s Preparatory School for phasing out sugary drinks, in her Hamilton Rotary Club address yesterday.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

Capturing the stark reality of living with diabetes
Wheelchairs, amputations, insulin injections ­— a special photography show opening at


Age Concern and the Bermuda Diabetes Association held a cooking demonstration and presentation about diabetes at Bermuda Gas.
We had a wonderful turn out!
Thank you to all who participated in making this a successful event.

City Hall this month highlights the nightmare of diabetes.
Local photographer Oliver Tucker, was commissioned by the Bermuda Diabetes Association to carry out a photo study of the disease in Bermuda.

Read more in the Royal Gazette.



A recent report from the Healthy Caribbean Coalition says that NCDs are the predominant health problem in CARICOM countries and cause substantially more deaths and disability than infectious diseases. Not only are mortality rates high, but CARICOM countries have approximately double the rate of premature deaths compared to richer countries. Additionally, high rates of the biological risk factors exist, especially obesity, diabetes and hypertension driven in turn by behaviours arising out of environmental and social conditions.
Read more of the report here.




Road race and walk: The Bermuda Diabetes Association received $17,197 from funds raised during this year's Lindo's to Lindo's road race and walk.


The case for treating sugar like a drug
"No one is talking about getting rid of it, but in order to solve this public health debacle we have to reduce consumption"
Read more at Vox.com.

3 Ways Excess Sugar Ravages Your Body
Is sugar the root cause of all our health problems? If you ask Robert Lustig, a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of California, San Francisco, the answer is yes. The dose determines the poison, and Americans are consuming 2 to 3 times the daily sugar dosage they should be. The result is our current diabesity health crisis.
Read more in The Fooducate blog.

You can make ‘healthy’ cool
Last month, I told you that St George’s Preparatory school had reported a decline in obesity rates after introducing a water only policy.
In the United States, a similar trend has been noted in preschoolers.

Read more in The Bermuda Sun.

Sugar (A not so sweet story)
We were smitten 10,000 years ago on the island of New Guinea. Today the average American [or Bermudian] downs 22.7 teaspoons a day.
Read more in the National Geographic.

Action urged on worldwide obesity crisis
The most comprehensive study on obesity ever conducted reveals that obesity rates have risen everywhere in the world for the last 30 years and that some of the most dramatic increases are being seen in children and adolescents.
Read more in The Globe and Mail.


Dr. Robert H. Lustig, MD
University of California endocrinologist, Dr. Robert Lustig, MD - whose YouTube lecture (Sugar: The Bitter Truth) has been watched more than 4 million times, visited Bermuda for a public presentation about the obesity crisis and how he believes we can get out of it, personally and as a society.

If you missed his talk, or would like a refresher, watch the YouTube video.

Read about the talk in the Royal Gazette.

"After hearing Dr Robert Lustig’s recent lecture for the Bermuda Diabetes Association about the connection between obesity and food additives, many people went home and threw out everything with high fructose corn syrup and sugar on the label."
Read more in the Royal Gazette from Jessie Moniz.


Dr Lustig spoke at TedX Bermuda in October 2013. Read what he had to say.
Or see his talk on YouTube [about 20 minutes].

Copies of Fat Chance are available for $25 at the Diabetes Resource Centre at the corner of Dundonald & Cedar Ave.


Read a review of Dr. Lustig's book in the UK Daily Telegraph

Diabetes Rates Skyrocket in American Youth
The prevalence of Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes jumped by 21% and 30%, respectively, in US youth over an eight-year period, according to new data. An estimated 215,000 Americans under the age of 20 have been diagnosed with diabetes.
Read more in The Diabetes Self-management Blog.

Sugary foods to avoid: The ‘healthy’ snacks and drinks that – like fruit juice – hide potentially harmful high levels of sugar
Sugar has received a bad press recently – from experts suggesting it might be as bad for us as smoking to hints, from England’s chief medical officer no less, that it might be taxed for the sake of public health.
Read more in The Independent.

Brazil takes an unambiguous new approach to fighting fat
Obesity has reached such epic proportions that Brazil’s new soccer stadiums include more than double the number of extra-wide seats required by World Cup authorities to accommodate both people with disabilities and heavyweight fans.
Read more in The Globe and Mail.

The average American eats 30 teaspoons of added sugar a day
In 1822, the average American consumed half a teaspoon of added sugar a day. By 1960 Americans consumed about six teaspoons of added sugar a day. Today the average American takes in more than 30 teaspoons of added sugar a day and most of this is from sugary drinks.
Read more in the Bermuda Sun.

Sugary drinks taxes have proven to work
Last month, we talked about Mexico and the tax that they are imposing on sugary drinks. Credit Suisse has publicly supported Mexico’s bold tactics to help reduce the obesity rates in Mexico.
Read more in the Bermuda Sun.

Dialysis patient numbers triple in ten years
It is understood that the majority of patients who need the treatment are suffering from diabetes — a chronic condition that often causes kidney damage. The number of diabetes patients on the Island is believed to have doubled in the last decade.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

Charity’s first Moon Walk raises $3,000 for diabetes prevention
Organizers said the charity’s first Moon Walk was “a huge success”, with 67 people taking part — more than twice the numbers expected. Among those attending were Governor George Fergusson and his wife Margaret.
Read more in the Bermuda Sun.

Argus Group Supports National Diabetes Month
The Argus Group has joined forces with the Bermuda Diabetes Association to support Diabetes Awareness Month. Argus will sponsor the organisation’s first Moon Walk for Diabetes as well as a lunch seminar on ‘Healthy Living with Diabetes.’ Both events are designed to raise awareness and support for diabetes education and outreach in Bermuda.
Read more on BermyNews.

How 'toxic' is sugar?
In the fifth estate’s season premiere, Gillian Findlay digs into the surprising science — and the reaction from the food industry — to reveal The Secrets of Sugar. Has the sugar industry been hiding an unsavoury truth from consumers?
Watch the programme preview from CBC television in Canada.

How to win the battle against diabetes
Patti Rose Smith was shocked and frightened when she was diagnosed with diabetes during a routine blood test. Now, 18 months and 63lbs later, she says she has never felt better.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

Diabetes: A disease that’s largely preventable
With the start of Diabetes Awareness Month today, the Ministry of Health and Seniors is undertaking an Island-wide survey to determine how many people have, or are at risk of developing, diabetes and other chronic diseases.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

Nearly every meal we eat is spiked with sugar
At the weekend I had the pleasure of attending the annual TedX conference held at the Southampton Princess. The one person who stood out for me was Professor Robert Lustig, an American pediatric endocrinologist exposing the dangers of sugar to the world.
Read more in the Bermuda Sun.

Fructose: the poison index
A ruling on fructose boosts the powerful sugar industry, either by incompetence or collusion, but is based on pseudoscience. Comment by Dr Robert Lustig
Read more in the Guardian [UK].

Bermuda has highest percentage of obese adults
More than 500 million adults worldwide are obese. Bermuda has the highest percentage of obese adults at 40 per cent, followed by the USA (nearly 34), Mexico (30), New Zealand (about 26), Australia (nearly 25) and Canada (just over 24).
Read more in the Bermuda Sun.

BPA, phthalates tied to kids’ weight, diabetes risk
Kids exposed to two chemicals used in food packaging are more likely to be obese or show signs of diabetes precursors than those with low exposure.
Read more in the Toronto Star.

Blood sugar linked to dementia, even without diabetes
You may have thought you dodged a bullet because your elevated blood sugars weren’t high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. But new research shows they may still be taking a toll on your health.
Read more in the Toronto Star.

Prevent type 2 diabetes through lifestyle changes
Imagine if diabetes were an infectious disease, passed from one person to the next. The whole world would be tackling it and putting policies and procedures in place to prevent it.
Read more in the Bermuda Sun.

NYC Introduces Fruit and Vegetable Prescription Program
The New York City Deputy Mayor and the Health Commissioner announced this week that New York will launch a new chapter of the Fruit and Vegetable Prescription Program, or FVRx, a program that allows doctors to "prescribe" fruits and vegetables to families at risk for obesity and diet-related illness.
Read more on the Serious Eats web site.

Sugar (A not so sweet story)
They had to go. The Coke machine, the snack machine, the deep fryer. Hoisted and dragged through the halls and out to the curb, they sat with other trash beneath gray, forlorn skies.
Read more in the National Geographic.

'Diabetes-cure' operation explained
The reason some patients are cured of type-2 diabetes after a gastric bypass may have been explained by US researchers. Their animal study showed bypassing the stomach made the intestines work harder, use more energy and keep blood sugar levels under control.
Read more from the BBC.

We should be eating as our grandparents did
Back in the 70’s, Dr John Yudkin provided the evidence the consumption of sugar and refined sweeteners was associated with coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes. In the space of one hundred and fifty years, we have gone from eating no added sugar to more than a kilogram a week.
Read more in the Bermuda Sun.

Spirit’s diabetes crew pulled together on voyage
The Spirit of Bermuda returned to Albuoys Point yesterday afternoon with a crew of 12 young people aged 13 to 37-years-old who all have type 1 diabetes. Bermuda Diabetes Association funded the event with a purpose of allowing those with type 1 diabetes to experience new confidence in their ability to self manage their disease.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

Type 1 diabetes vaccine hailed as 'significant step'
It may be possible to reverse type 1 diabetes by training a patient's own immune system to stop attacking their body, an early trial suggests.
Read more from the BBC.

The dangers of processed food
After hearing Dr Robert Lustig’s recent lecture for the Bermuda Diabetes Association about the connection between obesity and food additives, many people went home and threw out everything with high fructose corn syrup and sugar on the label.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

Diluting the sugar, one step at a time
As we know, sugar (in all it’s processed and concentrated forms) is probably our biggest problem. It’s incredibly addictive, widely available and hard to avoid even if you try. The more you eat, the more you want. It takes more and more to satisfy your sweet tooth, which has two very dangerous implications.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

AMA declares obesity a disease
The move by the American Medical Assn. board means that one-third of adults and 17% of children in the U.S. have a medical condition that requires treatment.
Read more.

Bermuda needs to act to prevent diabetes epidemic
Bermuda faces a healthcare “disaster” if the Island doesn’t rein in its diabetes epidemic, a leading healthcare speaker has warned.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

Making junk food giants redundant
I attended an interesting obesity symposium earlier this week. During question time, one of the doctors asked the speaker if fast or processed food manufacturers would be held accountable for their actions in the same way that tobacco companies have been.
Read more in the Royal Gazette.

Michael Moss, author of Salt, Sugar, Fat, talks about how the food companies hooked us
"Bliss point” — that’s what food scientists call the perfect sugary sweetness in a product that’s calculated to send the consumer over the moon. Read more in the Toronto Star

Lawyers From Suits Against Big Tobacco Target Food Makers
More than a dozen lawyers who took on the tobacco companies have filed 25 cases against industry players like ConAgra Foods, PepsiCo, Heinz, General Mills and Chobani that stock pantry shelves and refrigerators across America. Read more in the New York Times

Sugary drinks may increase the risk of kidney stones
Sugary beverages are known to contribute to obesity and tooth decay, but there is another reason to kick the soft-drink habit: Daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may increase the risk of kidney stones.Read more in The Globe and Mail

Diabetes doesn’t have to be the end, it can be the beginning
This summer it will be the sailors’ life for a group of children who will be swabbing the deck of the Spirit of Bermuda, hoisting the main sail and checking their blood sugar often. Read more

Five-time Olympic gold medallist, Sir Steve Redgrave has told Bermudians: don’t let diabetes stop you fulfilling your dreams.
Read the full story in the Bermuda Sun

Diabetes ‘time-bomb’ is a threat to millions
People are unaware they are at risk from the life-threatening illness. Diabetes UK said those with a normal body mass index but a large waist – defined as 31.5in or more for women and 35in or more for men – are most at risk from developing Type 2 diabetes. Read more

Diabetes warning over soft drinks
Just one can of sugary soft drink raises the relative risk of diabetes by around a fifth, a study has found. Every extra can consumed a day increased the chances of having the disease by 22%, compared with drinking one can a month or less. Read more

New drug 'could save the NHS £70m'
A new drug for Type 2 diabetes launched in the UK could save the NHS £70 million over the next five years, according to its manufacturer. Read more

Diabetes research points finger at sugar
The diabetes epidemic is only getting worse and according to a new study out of Stanford University, this is due to sugar being readily available in the food we eat and drinks we drink. Read more

You’ll pour on the lbs with high fructose corn syrup
You have several problems when you consume high fructose corn syrup. The first is that the body does not recognize that it has already eaten. The second is that high fructose corn syrup is addictive and we crave more and the third is that high fructose corn syrup is like pumping fat into our bodies. Read more

Walnuts cut diabetes risk by one quarter
Eating walnuts just two or three times a week can reduce the risk of type two diabetes by a almost a quarter, according to new research.

Some useful ways to cut out the sugar Read more

Officials tie soda intake to high obesity rates in NYC
Nine of New York City's 10 neighborhoods with the highest obesity rates also showed the highest intake of nondiet soda and other sugar-laden drinks, demonstrating a link between obesity and soda consumption, according to statistics released by city officials. The Wall Street Journal /The Associated Press

ESSO helps fill Diabetes Association’s coffers. Read more

Diabetes cases hit record and half go undiagnosed. Read more

My struggle with diabetes
Eight years ago Eddie Johnston had to quit his job because he couldn’t see or walk properly. Today doctors have helped him get his health back on track. Eddie shares his story on World Diabetes Day. Read more

Diabetics should get their feet checked Read more

Knock out the sugar with this recipe-filled calendar. Read more

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. Read more

Families must face up to the facts. Read more

Don't blame the parents for everything. Read more

Get walking towards a healthier lifestyle. Read more

New device tests blood glucose via smartphone Read more

Be prepared when travelling with diabetes Read more

Diabetes’ impact on health is put in focus Read more

Lack of exercise a leading health risk factor Read more

Change in diabetes mindset a must. Read more

Researcher weighs in on childhood obesity. Read more

KPMG Sponsors Youth Diabetes Workshop Read more

A tax should be put on sweet, sugary drinks Read more

Diabetics discover mayonnaise can't go with everything. Read more

The diabetes epidemic and what we must do. Read more

Shopping tours aim to empower diabetics Read more

Annual Exhibition reminds us why we have a diabetes epidemic in Bermuda. Read more

Lemon Tree launches Healthy Plate of the Day. Read more

Get rid of all your unhealthy foods and buy a pedometer. Read more

We're working on reducing diabetes amputations. Read more

All you need to know about testing your blood sugar levels. Read more

What are the costs of having diabetes? Read more

Diabetes news headlines provided courtesy of Medical News Today.